Mini-Mystery #4…the FINAL Mystery of the Hy Conrad Win a Kindle Fire Contest

All right, ladies and gentlemen. Here it is. The final diabolical mystery puzzle concocted by the Master of Mystery himself…Hy Conrad. 
Basically, here’s the deal. I’m trying to build awareness of Hy Conrad’s very first mystery novel entitled RALLY ‘ROUND THE CORPSE. Don’t know who Hy Conrad is? Shame on you! But if you look a few weeks back on my blog, you’ll find all the information out about him. Point is…Hy is criminal genius who uses his brilliance for good entertainment purposes. He’s the Guru of the Whodunnit. And he also happens to have been the writer/producer of TV’s MONK for all eight seasons. PLUS, he was the consulting producer of USA Network’s WHITE COLLAR as well. Anyway, he’s written a fantastic cozy mystery novel (see title above) that I was fortunate enough to publish (it was a dream come true!!!). So I devices this little ingenious plan. I asked Hy to device four of his patented awesome mini-mysteries that you can solve yourself. You read the mini-mystery, you guess the answer, you email me your guess. If you get it right, your name goes into the pool for a drawing to win a brand new Kindle Fire! Even better, you can earn double names in the pool just by sharing the mystery with friends and letting me know about it. After the solution for today’s mystery is revealed (next Saturday), I’ll be doing a random drawing to see who wins the Kindle Fire and will post it right here on the blog. It’s as simple as that. 

You really have nothing to lose and a Kindle Fire to gain! So give it a try. Send me your best guess as to a solution to today’s criminal masterpiece at kholloway@sevenrealmspublishing.com. Good luck!
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THE TRAYMORE JOB

Amy had spent a lazy morning at home and would be opening up late.  It didn’t matter, she told herself, since her first customers never trickled in until after 11.  But as rounded the corner of Hudson Street and saw the insurance investigator’s car parked in front of “Abel Adventures”, her heart sank.  She knew this car well and it was never good news.


As she walked closer, she could see that the trouble wasn’t at her travel agency, but at the shop next door.  Traymore Jewelers was a Village institution, a dusty emporium that somehow survived on even less business than Amy’s.  Toby Traymore, the owner, stood just inside the door, answering one last question from Gregory Till, the investigator from United Insurance.


“It kept pretty good time,” replied Toby.  He gazed mournfully at the mantle clock that had been knocked from its perch behind the counter.  It now lay broken on the hardwood floor, its hands permanently frozen at 7:47.  “I wound it yesterday morning and re-set the hands.  It’s been in this shop for decades, since I was a kid.”


You had to look closely to realize there’d been a burglary.  The average passerby might never have noticed the broken lock on the metal grate or the pried-open doorjamb.  But inside the shop, rows of old fashioned jewelry were no longer on display, their red velvet cases ripped and empty.  Traymore’s had been cleaned out.


Amy shared a few words of comfort with Toby, the same way he had comforted her when her place had been broken into a few months before.  Then, after Toby wandered back inside to wallow in his misery, Amy turned and said hello to Gregory.


“This block is bad luck,” he said, returning to his notes.  “At least your place didn’t have real valuables.  No offense.”


“None taken.”  Amy’s eyes drifted to the alarm box on the side wall.  “Did the alarm go off?”


“No,” said Gregory, shaking his head.  “It’s an old model, fairly easy to jimmy and shut down.  Unfortunately, there’s no log-clock telling us when it was turned off.  And no security camera.  A burglary waiting to happen.”


“And when did it happen?”


“Last night.  Toby and his assistant locked up around 5.  They both recall setting the alarm.  The clock was broken at 7:47, so the police are setting that as the approximate time.  A patrol car drove by a little after eight and noticed the broken lock on the grate.  By then the place had been emptied out.”  There was something about Gregory’s tone.


“You think it was an inside job,” guessed Amy.


“That’s what my instincts say.”  Gregory shrugged.  “Three people used the system and knew how bad it was.  But they all have alibis.  Toby, for example…  He says he was home alone.  A pathetic story.  But Toby’s upstairs neighbor locked himself out of his apartment.  He knocked on Toby’s door and came in for a drink, waiting until his wife got home with the keys.  So Toby has a solid alibi between 7:30 and 8 p.m.”


“How about the assistant?  Miranda?”


“Yeah, Miranda.”  Gregory checked his notes.  “Miranda was also home, over in Queens.  But the UPS man dropped off a package around 7:30 and she signed for it.  Her place is at over a half-hour from here, so her flimsy alibi is ironclad.”


“You said three people,” Amy prodded.


“The third was Igor Medjavich, a cleaning service employee.  He cleans the store every other Monday.  That means he has keys and knows the alarm.  His alibi is that he was at night school.  The CUNY campus on 24th Street.  Every Tuesday from 7 p.m. until 9.”


“Another solid alibi.  Did the police dust?”


“They did.  The alarm was clean.  So were the door and the register and the broken clock and the display cabinets.  They did find prints in the shop.  But Toby and Miranda and Igor would naturally leave prints   Who knows?  Maybe I’m wrong.”


Amy liked Gregory.  A few months ago it was a different story.  A few months ago, Gregory had held up her insurance claim, saying the same thing, that the burglary at “Abel Adventures” had been an inside job.  It had taken a murder to convince him – and the police – that he was wrong.


“You’re not wrong,” Amy told him.  “Not this time.  It was an inside job.”


“How do you know?”


“Well, first of all, there were no prints on the clock.”


Gregory had to stop for a minute and think.  It didn’t help.  “Okay, you lost me.  What does the lack of prints tell you?”


“It was an inside job,” Amy repeated.  “And who the burglar was.  Probably.  I can’t be 100 percent sure.”


WHAT DID THE LACK OF PRINTS SIGNIFY?
WHO IS THE MOST LIKELY SUSPECT?
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Remember…it doesn’t hurt to send me a guess, so go ahead and let me know what you think at kholloway@sevenrealmspublishing.com. And while you’re at it, why not go to your favorite book retailer and pick up a copy of Rally ‘Round the Corpse today! I’ll post the Amazon link here:

http://www.amazon.com/Rally-Round-Corpse-Adventures-Mystery/dp/0983735042/ref=tmm_pap_title_0 

And tune in Saturday afternoon for the answer. I’ll also reveal the date of the drawing Saturday as well.


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